Kings Canyon & Sequoia National Parks ~ October 11, 2014

With our bicycles snug on their sparkling new rack, we motored south, then east, to Kings Canyon National Park. Our ultimate destination was Las Vegas, and the plan was to wend through Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks on the way… a tree-tour-detour.

14 Kings Canyon NP

I’ve written previously, ad nauseam really, about the awe we’ve experienced walking among and connecting with these earthly giants. So, I’ll spare you from more adjectives and let the photos speak for themselves…

13 Kings Canyon NP

I’m sure all of our photos from this odyssey have been most capable of speaking for themselves all along. (Sigh)

04 Fallen Monarch Tree, Kings Canyon NP
Fallen Monarch Tree, Kings Canyon NP

08 Inside Fallen Sequoia, Kings Canyon NP

Yet, I write on.

15 General's Hwy, Seqouia NP

In honor of our last hours with the giants, here are some factoids that Trey recorded:

17 General Sherman Tree, Sequoia NP
General Sherman Tree, Sequoia NP
  • The General Sherman Sequoia is considered the world’s largest living tree by volume; it towers approximately 275 feet; and its base circumference is just shy of 103 feet
  • Redwood bark can get up to 12 inches thick, while sequoias’ bark can expand outwards 31 inches
  • Redwoods typically grow taller, but sequoias weigh more due to the girth of their trunks and branches

Sequoia Branches

  • The base of sequoia branches can be 40 feet in diameter stretching out to 8 feet in diameter… sequoia’s main branches look more like trees!
  • Sequoias tend to live longer than redwoods, about 3,500 vs 3,000 years
20 Heading down Hwy 198
Heading down Generals Highway (Hwy 198)

Highway 198, also known as Generals Highway, led us away from the giants and out of Sequoia National Park.

Like the Beartooth Highway in Montana/Wyoming and the Sea-to-Sky Highway in British Columbia, the drive down Generals Highway from Sequoia NP to Three Rivers is an adventure.

A must do whenever the opportunity presents itself, or even when it doesn’t. The twists are numerous, turns dizzying, and the scenery is gorgeous.

19 View from Hwy 198

22 Tunnel Rock, Hwy 198
Tunnel Rock, Hwy 198

A perfect transition to where the trajectory of our “great looping quest” was taking us…

…into the desert.

By the time we pulled into Bakersfield, California, the landscape was more reminiscent of West Texas…

25 Arriving in Bakersfield, CA

More Pics…

Sequoia Branches

Yosemite National Park, California ~ October 8 – 11, 2014

We’d left Carmel-by-the-Sea for Yosemite National Park without plans for where we’d sleep for the next three nights. Securing a campground reservation had proven impossible, so our shaky plan B was to show up, stand in line, and hope there’d been a last minute cancellation.

As we detoured across California to avoid wildfires, the hours passed into late afternoon and we grew even less confident that shaky plan B was the way to go. Still, we progressed forward and climbed closer to Yosemite’s south entrance as the sun fell below the surrounding mountains. Three miles out, we came upon what appeared to be a forest oasis — a beautiful lodge.

tenaya-lodge-exterior-1367x600
Source: tenayalodge.com

It also appeared to be way outside of our budget, but it had spoken to both us. As we passed it, Trey and I looked at each other and in silent agreement, Trey turned the Escape Mobile around and headed back, “It can’t hurt to check it out.”

The Tenaya Lodge was definitely a splurge, but Trey and his baby blues secured a hefty discount, making it doable. Walking in without a reservation proved to us once again that, “The Universe is on our side!”  

Yosemite National Park

With only two days to explore Yosemite we planned to cram in as much as possible. We hadn’t previously visited the park, but, based on everything we’d heard, we had high expectations. 

Bicycles in tow, we twisted northward along Hwy 41 toward Yosemite Valley. I thought the scenery was nice, but wondered, why all the hype? That is until a sharp curve led us into a tunnel and we emerged on the other side to this view…

01 Yosemite Valley -Tunnel View (Hwy 41)

I wish there was a word for when everything you thought you knew gets thrust into proper perspective by unimaginable beauty and grace — those moments when you only feel humility and gratitude for the honor of the experience.

It would have to be a particularly full, bold word, one that rolls off the tongue, such as flumgustered or hyperevoluted. Well, I guess there is wonderstruck, but no; I was flumgustered to tears, my conscious was hyperevoluted as I grasped the immense power of nature’s mass and force.

01.5 El Capitain from Tunnel View (Hwy 41)
Majestic El Capitan

We had a full day of exploring ahead, but the “Tunnel View” beckoned us to stay. So spying a trailhead above the parking lot, we headed up Inspiration Point Trail for a higher vantage. The 1.3 mile path provided even more magic:  flying squirrels soared across the trail in front of us; mosaic pine tree trunks enticed us upwards…

and massive madronas painted the pathway with white blooms and redbrick limbs.

03 Inspiration Point Hike 3

The path to Inspiration Point is steep but the views are truly inspiring and worth the climb.

04 Yosemite Valley - Inspiration Point

03.6 Yosemite Valley - Inspiration Point 2

By the time we left the Tunnel View area and arrived in Yosemite Valley we were famished, so we shared a generous bowl of chicken rigatoni at the majestic Ahwahnee Lodge.

05 Climbers on Washington Column

Our bicycle tour was delayed further as we stuck around the Ahwahnee parking lot to gawk at freestyle climbers inching their way up Washington Column.

With its 12 miles of pathways, Yosemite is perfect for exploring by bicycle.

bike-path-map

06 Yosemite Bike Path

The remaining afternoon was spent peddling the length of the valley, crossing historic stone bridges…

06.7

…and stopping for short hikes through meadows and up to Lower Yosemite Falls, which was almost a trickle.

08 Lower Yosemite Falls

The afternoon’s highlight was spotting a momma bear and her cubs loading up on ripening apples in preparation for the approaching winter.

07 Cub catching up to his momma in Yosemite Valley

California was in extreme drought, this was evident on the drive from Carmel, and it was obvious throughout Yosemite Valley.

06.5 Merced River and Half Dome, Yosemite

The Merced River was barely flowing and the mountain creeks feeding it were bone dry. That, however, did not take away from the beauty of Yosemite.

The sun’s descent was progressing as we re-secured our bicycles to the back of the Escape Mobile — a timing that we hadn’t planned, but was perfect for sidetracking up Glacier Point Road.

The drive-in-and-out road is just shy of 16 miles (each way).  It cuts up from Wawona Road (Hwy 41) just south of Tunnel View, and twists deep into the wilderness. (We spotted what appeared to be a wolf on the drive up, and a coyote on the return trip.)

14 Half Dome from Glacier Point, Yosemite

The sunset panoramas were spectacular as was the view of the valley below. From the height of Glacier Point one easily sees how and where ancient monster glaciers cut through mountains to carve out the valley.

15-yosemite-valley-from-glacier-point-2.png
Yosemite Valley from Glacier Point

We hadn’t anticipated the bonus of the setting sun’s colors reflecting off the eastern rocky cliffs.

18 Half Dome from Glacier Point at Sunset
Half Dome from Glacier Point at Sunset

We stood mesmerized, flumgustered, until we noticed stars beginning to dot the darkening sky.

19 On Top of the World, Glacier Point, Yosemite

We secured ourselves among boulders a safe distance away from the mountain’s ledge and watched as the stars slowly painted the sky. We also noticed mysterious lights appearing one-by-one on the face of half-dome… climbers tethered to its ledges for the night.

20 Camper's Light, Half Dome from Glacier Point, Yosemite
Camper’s light on the ledge of Half Dome

As blackness fell over us, we hoped to see the milky way. However, due to a significant decrease in temperature coupled with the realization that we had no flashlight for the half-mile rocky trek back to the car, we decided to follow another couple down from the observation deck. (They had a flashlight.)

Mariposa Grove

Mariposa Grove 02

We’d already fallen in love with the giants of Redwood National Park, but had yet to experience the noble Sequoias.

Mariposa Grove 12

A planned short hike through Mariposa Grove turned into an all-day 8-mile journey.

Mariposa Grove 15 - Telescope Tree

With soft intent we strolled through the grove, communing with the giants along the way.

The grove was declared as “Mariposa Grove” after a couple of white dudes, Galen Clark and Milton Mann, happened upon it in 1857.

Mariposa Grove 09 - Historic Museum

However, evidence of indigenous people occupying the area dates back 3,000 years; Grizzly Giant would have been a mere sapling.

Grizzly Giant, Mariposa Grove
Grizzly Giant, Mariposa Grove

The Universe is on Our Side… Again

A reversing incident in Yosemite had somewhat destabilized our bicycle rack. So before heading to Kings Canyon National Park, Trey tightened each bolt and balanced the rack securely enough to make it the 60 miles to Fresno. (We had assumed that Fresno was the closest city large enough to have a proper bike shop.)

We’d traveled only 14 miles, to the tiny town of Oakhurst, when the rack’s arm flailed backwards and dangled our bikes sideways a few feet above the pavement. We immediately pulled into a parking lot and checked for phone service. Two bars allowed me to search for the nearest bike shop.

Gmaps seemed to be confusing our location with that of the nearest bike shop, so I looked up and around for assurance. Right there in the same parking lot, and directly in front of where our bikes had nearly crashed to the road, was Yosemite Bike & Sport. It wouldn’t open for another 10 minutes, but we walked over to the store front anyway to check out the shop while we waited.

Driving through terra incognita and having one’s bicycle rack deconstruct directly in front of the only bike shop within in a 60-mile radius is magical enough. Right? Well, not this day. As we approached the store’s display window we couldn’t believe what we saw… our exact bicycle rack sat new, fully assembled, and ready for use. (And no, it wasn’t a common brand or model.)

More Pics

07.5 Lower Yosemite Falls Trail

17 Yosemite Valley from Glacier Point at Sunset